Details

Racial Profiling and the NYPD


Racial Profiling and the NYPD

The Who, What, When, and Why of Stop and Frisk

von: Jay L. Newberry

51,16 €

Verlag: Palgrave Macmillan
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 15.06.2017
ISBN/EAN: 9783319580913
Sprache: englisch

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Beschreibungen

This book analyzes New York City’s stop-and-frisk data both pre- and post-constitutionality ruling, examining the existence of both profiling and unequal treatment among the three largest groups identified in the database: Blacks, Whites, and Hispanics. The purpose for using these two time periods is to determine which group(s) benefited the most from the ruling. This research goes beyond standard statistics to identify the place that race holds in contributing to the stop disparities. Specifically, this research will adds a spatial element to the numbers by analyzing the determinants of stop location by race, applying a principal component analysis to a mixture of census and stop-and-frisk data to determine the influence of location on stops by race. The results present a way of determining the plausibility of stops being the product of racial profiling–or just a matter of happenstance.
Table of ContentsAcknowledgments iiList of Tables vList of Figures vINTRODUCTION 1Progression of Text 4Importance of this Work 6Bibliography 6CHAPTER ONE: IN THE SHADOW OF LADY LIBERTY 8The Legal Basis for Stop-and-Frisk 9Darker Days in The Big Apple 13The Stop-and-Frisk Credit Contradiction 14The Brownsville Blitz 16Bringing up the Numbers 17Bibliography 19CHAPTER TWO: BROKEN WINDOWS OR BREAKING COMMUNITIES 22Criticisms of Broken Windows 24Breaking Windows and the Quality of Life 25Policing the Community or Policing for the Community 28Bibliography 36CHAPTER THREE: THE IMPACT OF BROKEN WINDOW ON POLICE PRACTICES IN NEW YORK CITY 38The Trends 40The Constitutionality Challenge 42The Cause? 43Bibliography 45CHAPTER FOUR: ANALYTICAL METHODS 47Analytical Methods 49The Principal Component Analysis 49The PCA Data and Procedures 50The Data Envelopment Analysis 52The Location 53Bibliography 54CHAPTER FIVE: ANALYTICAL RESULTS 56The Principal Component Analysis Dimension Extraction Results 56PCA Regression Results for 2012 57PCA Regression Results for 2014 59The Data Envelopment Analysis Results 60Group Efficiency Results 60Borough Level Efficiency 63The Best and the Worst Precincts 63CHAPTER 6: DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION 65Discussion 66Stop-and-Frisk Environments 68Stop-and-Fisk Efficiency 71Conclusion 72Bibliography 75Index 76
Jay L. Newberry is Assistant Professor of Geography at Binghamton University
This book analyzes New York City’s stop-and-frisk data both pre- and post-constitutionality ruling, examining the existence of both profiling and unequal treatment among the three largest groups identified in the database: Blacks, Whites, and Hispanics. The purpose for using these two time periods is to determine which group(s) benefited the most from the ruling. This research goes beyond standard statistics to identify the place that race holds in contributing to the stop disparities. Specifically, this research will adds a spatial element to the numbers by analyzing the determinants of stop location by race, applying a principal component analysis to a mixture of census and stop-and-frisk data to determine the influence of location on stops by race. The results present a way of determining the plausibility of stops being the product of racial profiling–or just a matter of happenstance.
Appeals to urban geographers, sociologists and criminal justice researchers examining the rise of the stop-and-frisk policy internationallyGrounded in empirically research and statistically strong analysis of census dataAnswers the question of whether or not the constitutional ruling of stop-and-frisk has had an impact on the way in which stop-and-frisk is carried out

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